2.9.14

Inside The Paris Review: NYC Offices

Two photographers take a look around the iconic literary journal
Photograph: Sara Kerens
Photograph: Sara Kerens
Photograph: Paul Barbera
Photograph: Paul Barbera
Photograph: Paul Barbera
Photograph: Paul Barbera
Photograph: Paul Barbera
Photograph: Paul Barbera
Photograph: Paul Barbera
Photograph: Sara Kerens
Photograph: Sara Kerens
Photograph: Sara Kerens
Photograph: Sara Kerens
Photograph: Sara Kerens
Photograph: Sara Kerens
Photograph: Sara Kerens
From Lena Dystant (Selectism):

Part of the “Where They Create” project, photographer Paul Barbera goes inside the offices of legendary literary journal, The Paris Review. 208 issues on from its first in 1953, the magazine was orginally produced by Harold L. Humes, Peter Matthiessen, and George Plimpton, Americans in Paris, the opening statement reading "The Paris Review hopes to emphasize creative work—fiction and poetry—not to the exclusion of criticism, but with the aim in mind of merely removing criticism from the dominating place it holds in most literary magazines…" Featuring interviews and work from the likes of Hemingway, Faulkner, Ezra Pound, V. S. Naipaul, Joan Didion and Truman Capote, the magazine continues to introduce the work of new writers and reevaluate established names. More in our gallery, for the full set of images head here and read an interview with current editor Lorin Stein here. [Read More]
From Claudine Ko (Refinery 29):
In New York City's esteemed literary world, there are parties, and then there are The Paris Review parties. Indeed, as long as the quarterly journal has garnered respect for discovering new writing talent — Jack Kerouac, Adrienne Rich, and David Foster Wallace, to name a few — it's also been known for its all-night, booze-flowing soirĂ©es where society and the counterculture drink from the same bottle of whiskey.

“It’s always been two things at once,” says editor Lorin Stein. “On the one hand, it’s a hyper-sophisticated, modernist, avant-garde magazine. On the other hand, it’s sort of a destination party.” And over the decades, the 60-year-old publication has continually attracted an eclectic crowd, from Jackie O, Truman Capote, and Norman Mailer, to more recently, Zadie Smith, Malcolm Gladwell, and the editors of Vice. [Read More]
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