28.11.10

Irish Company: James Joyce and Samuel Beckett

Friedhelm Rathjen embarks on a cycling tour of Ireland in search of his literary heroes
Photograph: Friedhelm Rathjen
Friedhelm Rathjen's Irish Company: Joyce & Beckett and more is a collection of essays and notes spanning more than twenty years. Some material will be familiar to readers of James Joyce Quarterly, Joyce Studies Annual, Papers on Joyce and Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd’hui, but the book also contains a wealth of previously unseen essays and reflections.

To find out more, contact Friedhelm Rathjen or visit Amazon-Germany.

Contents

I: Getting there

Singing Wheels
Cycling the Irish Border in 1999
Walking Donegal with Dylan Thomas
The Joys of Cycling with Beckett
What Happened to Joyce in Galway and Connemara?
An Attempt to Baedekerize James Joyce
James Joyce as a Cyclist

II: Being there

Molly Through the Garden / Reaching for the Bloom
A Joycean Look at John Eglinton’s Dana Magazine
Trivia ShemSamiana
Horses versus Cattle in Ulysses
Thorne Smith in the Wake
Arno Schmidt’s Neglected Recommendation
Chancelation & Transincidence
How to Deal With Coincidentals in Translating Finnegans Wake
Translating Names, Titles and Quotations
Ten Practitioners’ Rules, Derived from and Applied to German Renderings
of Ulysses and Finnegans Wake
Sprakin sea Djoytsch?
Finnegans Wake into German
In Principle, Beckett is Joyce (and Schmidt is Schmidt)
The Magic Triangle and Giordano Bruno’s Coincidentia Oppositorum
TOTALITY.ZIP
How Melville, Joyce, and Beckett Unzip the World
Neitherways
Long Ways in Beckett’s Shorts

III: Getting back

“The ashplant is Stephen’s Bloom-ing rod”
Stephen, Bloom, and Seamus Heaney on Sandymount Strand
Silence, Migration, and Cunning
Joyce and Rushdie in Flight
Joyce in Galsworthy
Edward Thomas / James Joyce
Inventing a Connection
Arnotations
Arno Schmidt annotates Finnegans Wake
Arno Schmidt’s Utilization of James Joyce
Some Basic Conditions
69 Ways To Play Sam Again
Beckettiana in Jürg Laederach’s Works and Letters

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